STORING CABBAGES AND KALE

  • Cool enough, not too damp
  • The outer leaves are the packaging
  • Cheer up with cold water

Cool but not cold

Heads of cabbage like the cool. It’s fine to keep kale in a plastic bag for a while. The aim – like with (considerably more delicate) lettuce – is for the plants to be damp inside but not outside.

Their own original packaging

Keep the heads of cabbage whole as long as you can, the outer leaves work well as packaging. When you cut cabbage, the cut surfaces will dry out and need to be cut off.

Kale in a bag

Kale is at its best when freshly harvested. If it’s been stored for a while, splash it with a little water and store it in a plastic bag.

Distinguish between root vegetables and other vegetables

Green leaves and vegetables that grow above ground use up their water reserves and their nutrients much more quickly than root vegetables, which can be said to hibernate. Store them in different drawers of the fridge.

Pickling cabbage

Sauerkraut is a preparation method, a spice and a means of storage. It’s a real classic that’s surprisingly easy to make: Slice white cabbage thinly, very thinly. Add salt and spices. Press the vegetable down so the salt is absorbed. Pack into a glass jar (it’s important that there aren’t any air bubbles left) and store at room temperature for two weeks. After that store your sauerkraut in the fridge. It will be best after a month but lasts for up to a year.

Frozen kale

Stock the freezer with kale when it’s in season. Tear off the leaves and parboil them quickly in lightly salted water. Cool down in cold water with pieces of ice in. Drain and squeeze out the water, place in bags and freeze.

Springier in cold water

Cabbage that has gone soft will regain some of its elasticity if you put it in cold water in the fridge. Leave it for 24 hours. No longer.

 

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